INFORMATION & RESOURCES FOR TRANS STUDENTS 

Today’s society is recognizing the experiences and needs of transgender people as never before. This trend is most evident in our nation’s schools, where an increasing number of transgender and gender-expansive students live openly as their authentic selves. At the same time, parents, students, educators, administrators and other stakeholders are working together to determine the best ways to support these students. ​​

​Many are unfamiliar with the needs of transgender students, and attempts to meet those needs can be fraught with emotion for all involved. Educators may have concerns about their own capacity to support their transgender students, or hesitate to act because of personal feelings or fear of negative reactions from the larger community. Transgender students themselves may struggle with a variety of issues in seeking to be authentically seen, including the fear of social rejection and mistreatment or abuse from peers. As a result, many of these students hope to escape notice and to simply survive rather than flourish. 


LEARN MORE ABOUT TRANS IDENTITIES AND HOW TO BEST SUPPORT OUR TRANS STUDENTS & COMMUNITY.
Transgender Student Rights
and our responsibility to protect them...
Transgender students are protected from discrimination, bullying, and harassment under many federal and state laws. This includes Title IX, the federal law that bans sex discrimination in schools. Here’s some information about what rights transgender students have at school and how you can advocate for yourself or transgender students in your life.
TRANS  101
Gender Identity
Our gender identity is how we see ourselves. Some of us see ourselves as women, some as men, some as a combination of both, some as neither. Some of us have complex identities that may even be fluid and change over time. For instance, some of us see ourselves as female to male trans people who also identify as butch women and genderqueer and some days as drag queens.
Everyone has a gender identity. And, everyone expresses their gender identity. We all make choices about how to cut or not cut the hair on our head, the hair on our legs, what clothes to wear, whether or not and what type of make-up to wear, what body parts to accentuate or not, etc, etc. We all make hundreds of conscious decisions every day about how we are going to express our gender. We all have a gender identity.

Transgender people (very broadly conceived) are those of us whose gender identity and/or expression does not or is perceived to not match stereotypical gender norms associated with our assigned gender at birth. 
Friends & Family
How to Be an Ally
Relationships
Neurodivergence
People of Colour
SUPPORTING 
Supporting Trans & Non-Binary Students
Transgender & Non-Binary Students
San Diego Unified School District is committed to creating and sustaining welcoming, safe, andsupportive school environments for transgender and gender nonconforming students in 
accordance with the California school success and opportunity act (January 2014). All schools in SDUSD provide access to facilities and extracurricular activities that align with students' 
gender identity. SDUSD is devoted to ensuring safe, supportive, and welcoming school sites, 
free from discrimination and harassment, for all students.
SURVIVAL TIPS
Survival Tips
for Trans Youth
Transgender and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) youth face serious legal obstacles, and many endure discrimination and violence on a daily basis in school, while obtaining health
care and in the criminal justice system. The challenges of changing one’s name, finding access to hormones or enduring police brutality demands a distinctly adult set of skills and can take a their toll on a young person If you don’t have a safe place to call home, it’s difficult to get a
handle on the other struggles in your life. TGNC youth have a high rate of homelessness because many can’t rely on parental support—whether financial or emotional. Not to mention that mistreatment at school is so common that many drop out.

The fact is, however, that nobody has the legal right to harass you simply because of who you are or are perceived to be. Laws and policies exist at multiple levels to prohibit discrimination
based on gender identity or expression. 
TRANSGENDER
Transgender Students
Students in Schools (2016)
San Diego Unified School District is committed to creating and sustaining welcoming, safe, and supportive school environments for transgender and gender non-conforming students in accordance with the California school success and opportunity act (January 2014). All schools in SDUSD provide access to facilities and extracurricular activities that align with students' gender identity. SDUSD is devoted to ensuring safe, supportive, and welcoming school sites, free from discrimination and harassment, for all students.
BENDING THE MOLD
Bending the Mold
Action Kit for Transgender Students
Transgender and gender-nonconforming students come out every day all
over the country, and they deserve to be treated with respect and fairness.
Some schools are already supportive of gay, lesbian and bisexual students, but
need more education around transgender issues. Other schools discourage
diversity in both sexual orientation and gender identity, and suppress or punish
certain forms of gender expression. But transgender people of all ages
are steadily organizing, advocating and winning legal battles, and those
victories are strengthening our successes in the classroom. Transgender
and gender-nonconforming youth are a key part of the transgender rights
movement, and momentum is building. Our voices can be heard everywhere.
TRANSFORMING
Schools in Transition
Schools 
Today’s society is recognizing the experiences and needs of transgender people as
never before. This trend is most evident in our nation’s schools, where an increasing
number of transgender and gender-expansive students live openly as their authentic
selves. At the same time, parents, students, educators, administrators and other
stakeholders are working together to determine the best ways to support these
students. 

​Many are unfamiliar with the needs of transgender students, and attempts to meet
those needs can be fraught with emotion for all involved. Educators may have
concerns about their own capacity to support their transgender students, or hesitate
to act because of personal feelings or fear of negative reactions from the larger
community. Similarly, families and caregivers are sometimes uncertain about what
support their child needs in school or question the school’s commitment to the
well-being of their child. This dynamic can create an adversarial relationship among
the very individuals working to support the student. Finally, transgender students
themselves may struggle with a variety of issues in seeking to be authentically seen,
including the fear of social rejection and mistreatment or abuse from peers. As a
result, many of these students hope to escape notice and to simply survive rather
than flourish. 

MODEL POLICY
Model Policy
 for Transgender and GNC Students 
This document presents our Model School District Policy on Transgender and Gender
Nonconforming Students, which outlines best practices for schools to ensure that all students are safe, included, and respected in school, regardless of their gender identity or expression—including transgender and gender nonconforming students. The model presents some policy objectives, key points, and alternatives to consider. It is meant to be adaptable
to the specific needs of your school district, while keeping the original intent of the policy intact. Depending on your school district, the policy language provided here may fit best in a district policy, an administrative regulation, or a combination of the two. Our model was
developed by examining school district policies from various states, drawing from guidance provided by states and the federal government, and identifying best practices for a national context.
GLSEN'S TRANS
Trans Student Supports
Student Resources 
Check out GLSEN's Trans Student Resouces which include:

    -"Dear Trans Students, from a Trans Educator #HUMANIZE ME"

   -TGNC Student Blogs

   -"Gender Terminology"

   -"What Does it Mean to Be Genderfluid?"

   -Separation and Stigma: Transgender Youth and School Facilities"

​   -And much more...

  
TRANSGENDER LIVES
Your Stories
Your Stories
The New York Times

As part of a series of editorials about transgender experiences, we are featuring personal stories that reflect the strength, diversity and challenges of the community. Welcome to this evolving collection.
TRANS 101
Trans 101
Student Resources 
WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT

When we think of the word gender a whole bunch of images
rush to mind. Most of us are taught the idea that everyone’s either born a boy
or a girl, and expected to identify a certain way based on what’s between your legs.


But that actually isn’t true for everyone, and totally ignores the huge and
amazing world of people who are trans and gender diverse. That’s what we’re
going to dive into during this series, being trans, gender identity, and what its all about.



Welcome to Trans 101.

  
OUR VIDEO GALLERY
  1. Things NOT to Say to a Non-Binary Person
  2. How to Support Trans Students
  3. Support Trans Students Webinar
  4. Why Gender Pronouns Matter
  5. ACLU Rights Watch
  6. Trans People Talk to Their Younger Selves
  7. How to talk (and listen) to Transgender People
  8. What it's Like to be Trans in high School
  9. Parents Explain Gender
  10. Shut Out of Bathrooms, a Trans Boy Struggles to Survive High School
  11. Beyond Bathrooms: The Transgender Student Experience